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have a predictable regulatory environment. we do a good job of educating the kids. we have a good tax break. we're doing all the things -- >> it sounds like you're agreeing with the pope then? >> you look at the result, we have less disparity in the income that can most any other state. we would love to have the pope. he can come to provo anytime. >> you have a deep and personal passion about helping the poor, and i suspect you resonated deeply with pope francis ooze comments which were very powerful and compelling in many ways, but i'm puzzled. wise in the last 30 years we've had dramatic economic growth. i was very fortunate i was there with reagan and with clinton. in the case of the clinton administration when we worked with them, from 1993 to 200, one of the very four people of poverty left poverty, and huge economic growth. about 3 1/2, 4 million people, xw a million and a half people, lost their jobs. why is it so hard to look at the things that have work. try to find a way and say, which of these pieces really worked. find out what are their patterns? and how can we replicate
posted on my facebook page. i hear you support common core education standards. i'll never watch your show again. another said, if you support common core, you have hoes -- you've lost my trust. another one, you need to learn the truth about common core. the person who said he never would watch my show again won't hear this and that's too bad. i want to cut to the chase itch don't support what common core has become in many states or school districts. i'm dead set against the federal government creating a uniform curriculum for any subject. i oppose the collection of personal data on students that would identify them and then track them, and certainly any effort to give that personal information to the federal government. i am steadfast in my belief that parents, parents, should ultimately decide. the best for their children's education, whether it's public schools, private schools, religious schools, or home schools. i believe education is a local or state function, not a federal one. sadly, the very label, common core, has come to be associated with things i detest, like agenda-driv
-year-olds. the u.s. education secretary arnie duncan calling it stagnation. but before we talk about how to fix the problem, let's look deeper. there might be a lotle less her than meets the eye. they're broken down in connecticut, florida, and massachusetts. in connecticut and massachusetts, two of the richest states in the union were students generally perform better than the worldwide average. the policy substitute said that america lags in social testing. if you were to correct for their massive income inequality, the performance is better than it appears. consider that the top issuer in all three categories was shanghai, a result that gave rise to headlines proclaiming china has having the smartest students. they are just 1.7% of china's population. country, essentially forces many of the children of poor workers to leave shanghai for high school. while testing was done three years ago in china's rural areas, the chinese government only allowed the release of shanghai's scores. it underlies almost every conversation we have about conversation and education policy in america. so
education to health care to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history. the belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. now, over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates. i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months, so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all-time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustrations rooted in their own daily battles, to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense
job today without some higher education, so we've helped more students go to college with grants and loans that go farther than before. we've made it more practical to repay those loans and today more students are graduating from college than ever before. we're also pursuing an aggressive strategy to promote innovation that reins in tuition cost. we have a lower cost so young people are not burdened by enormous debt when they make the right decision to get higher education. and next week, michelle and i will bring together college presidents and non-profits to lead a campaign to help more low-income students attend and succeed in college. but -- [ applause ] while higher education may be the surest path to the middle class, it's not the only one. so we should offer our people the best technical education in the world. that's why we've worked to connect local businesses with community colleges so workers, young and old, can earn the new skills that earn them more money. and i've also embraced an idea that i know all of you at the center for american progress have championed. and b
highlighting the fact that a lot of this job growth, good jobs, manufacturing, education, construction. so they say that those are signs that the economy is moving in the right direction. at the same time, as you point out, the white house looking at those numbers and using them to argue that unemployment insurance should be extended for 1.3 million americans. they point out that within those economic figures you can see 4 million americans have been unemployed for six months or more. here's what president obama had to say in his weekly address. take a listen. >> for many families it can be the difference between hardship and catastrophe. it makes a difference for a mother who suddenly doesn't know if she will be able to put food on the table for his kids or a father who lost his job and is looking for a new one. last year it ended 2.5 people out of poverty and cushioned the blow for many more. >> now, alex, republicans are making the opposite argument. they are saying that the low unemployment rate or relatively low unemployment rate speaks to the fact that the economy doesn't need more s
, but stronger labor laws, more funding for education and a social safety net. >> but the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. the combined trends of increase and equality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> susan page is the washington bureau chief for usa today. clarence page, no relation, pulitzer prize-winning columnist and it's the first time we've had the pages squared on my show. >> it's great to have both of you. the president ticked off the statistics to how a growing number of americans face the reality of lower, real wages and higher costs. the prospect of a next generation with fewer opportunities for economic advancements that all to me sounds like, susan, a lot of the rhetoric from his 2008 campaign. why this push now and why the prospects of change now? >> i think it dates back to the 2008 presidential campaign and these their is wha
a wage when they're trying to earn a living. as we have more older and highly educated people in that sector. >> if you had a perfect system in a test tube, though, and it's not that way, it just seems to me, if you can find someone not working that is willing to work at whatever the market price is, you can fill enough jobs that you want, it seems like, you know, if you're true to economics, it seems like you would never set anything. you'd want the market. >> this is an idea that says -- >> and the other thing, jared, is it not this simple? a company can either have 100 people at $8 an hour or 80 people at $10 an hour. >> it's definitely not that simple. let me respond to both of those. i thought it was gary who gave a good list of the way that minimum wages -- the increases tend to get absorbed. and that's why, joe, your second point i think is wrong. he talked about profits, he talked about prices. there's also efficiency gains. clearly, the absorption mechanism isn't just on the employment margin. that's why we get those results i've been describing through our discussion
american education system this morning is not looking good for the next generation. in fact an international assessment of teens around the world shows u.s. students slipping even further behind. the united states ranking 26th in math scores, dropping one point since 2009, which was the last time the test was given. the u.s. is at 21st place in science, which is a drop of four spots and dropped three spots to 17th in reading. by contrast, several asian countries and cities, including japan and singapore saw their students improve significantly. education secretary arne duncan addressed the findings early this morning. >> it is a picture of educational stagnation. the brutal truth that urgent reality must serve as a wake-up call against educational complacency and low expectations. we're running in place as other high-performing countries start to lap us. >> michelle rhee is the ceo and founder of students first and joins us now. michelle, are you surprised by what this new assessment is saying about american students or do you think that this is on track, knowing what you kn
is education. you have more people going to college than ever before, which means more debt, but that doesn't necessarily mean better paying jobs. we're talking about $15 to $20 an hour. do you think raising the minimum wage would have an impact on the way we at least think about education? would more people be less likely to want to go to school if they're getting paid more without having to go? >> i don't think the minimum wage has much of an impact on educational decision. i do think that college is still a good deal, but the reality is that inequality is growing even amongst those who actually go to college. the median college salary is not really keeping pace with the rest of the economy. so again, i think when thinking about the overall picture about inequality, we do need a number of different tools. i think the minimum wage plays one part of that but an important one. >> one of the arguments that corporations like mcdonald's and wendy's in particular like to make is, well, if we raise wages, then we're going to have to raise prices, and you guys don't want that and they throw out th
was in some ways accidentally privileged by being able to get a missionary education, and he started out life essentially with a tremendous sense of self-confidence inspired by his local community. and to take him from that position which makes him an aspiring lawyer, by his early 30s he's already rising the ranks of the anc only marks the ways in which he evolved as an individual. and i think we have to hold that in place because he lived so long that he was able to draw on so many strains of thought. so, yes, he went through a period where he embraced africanism or black nationalism to a point where the notion of race first many the tradition of a marcus garvey in the united states, for example, this notion that black people have to solidify. and yes, the anc, there was tension there. >> such a great point, he lives to be nearly 100 years old. his trajectory for change is very different from that of a king who was assassinated while still a young man. one quick question then more after the break. not only do we misremember mandela, we misremember ourselves in relationship to mandela. we now
deep, deep, deep cuts in education and unemployment benefits and health insurance for the poor. they've even gone after preschool in the state, all policies that will pretty directly hit the shoppers at the pope family stores, right? bargain town, bill's dollar store, the super 10 the super dollar, treasure mart, roses, maxway, all of the dollar stores that are part of their empire, all of the discount dollar stores that have made art pope and his family all of their many millions, which they have now spent to go after the poor in north carolina in a way that nobody has in more than 100 years. today, the state's naacp held a news conference outside the state budget office, outside art pope's office, announcing a campaign targeting mr. pope's discount stores. they're calling it a picketing campaign to educate dollar store customers about what they called the extreme and aggressive policies that they are funding by shopping at stores owned by mr. pope. >> we want to put a stop to the use of wealth to influence policies in a negative way. that's why it's not a boycott, it's a picket. >>
to learn about risk management. more and more companies like td ameritrade are taking all of the education and insights that they need to know and delivering it free of charge. >> is that like the casino? >> i do not think so. in terms of the sustainability of my business, i will continue to have a job. education is a key component of that. the more successful our clients are, the more successful our businesses will be. >> next question. the amount of options and derivatives in td ameritrade at the time was about 9% of volume. it is now in the mid-40's. that is incredible growth. there is a different climate. how do we move this huge growth down to this younger generation? how do we make it so that it is investable for them? >> absolutely. this goes back to what i was saying before. make sure you are providing the tools for that younger generation. think about how they live now. they are gaming on their mobile devices. it could be video or written. they like to follow and interact socially. that is one of the things that we have done with dough. we provide all of those avenues for the youn
for one-to-one support and education. i love chalk and erasers. but change is coming. all my students have the brand new surface. it has the new windows and comes with office, has a real keyboard, so they can do real work. they can use bing smartsearch to find anything in the world... or last night's assignment. and the battery lasts and lasts, so after school they can skype, play games, and my favorite...do homework. change is looking pretty good after all. ♪ >> i stand here before you not as a prophet, but as a humble servant of you, the people. your heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. >> that was nelson mandela hours after he was released from prison from his 27-year stint in prison. news of his passing is drawing huge crowds. the nation's mourning has become a celebration of the man south africans call madiba. >> moments ago, they released details for the funeral plans. the country will pay tribute over the next days. sunday will be a national day of prayer and reflection. there will be a massive public memorial at the soccer stadium on december 10th. man
's covered by most health plans. >>> there's no question the world of education isn't what it used to be. ask anyone from teachers to parents, even students themselves. a new report by the american civil liberties union of pennsylvania looked at student discipline and whether the practice of zero tolerance is actually helping or hurting students and the verdict -- well, the overly broad policy just isn't working. and joining me to discuss is broward county public school superintendent robert brunsy, president of national school services committee and psychologist wendy walsh. >> tell us what zero tolerance is and why turn away from it now? >> well, the reason why we would turn away from it is because zero tolerance policies are not effective. in 2011 in broward county, we had the largest number of stude student school-related arrests in florida. 1,062. out of that 754 of them, about 75%, were for non-violent misdemeanor offenses. these are things that would normally have been handled by schools in the past and as we see the numbers continue to grow, they just put children on a trajectory that
. the number of black children who get educate in the integrated schools is something like 10%. you look at the leadership zuma versus mandela. and it doesn't seem as if this were and upward trend. >> that's true and that discrepancy is true. but it's also true that the standard of living of black south africans has risen considerably since 1993, that the number of black south africans with electricity and clean drinking water and in the education system, all of it's gone up. south africa when you look at it from the outside, a glass half empty, glass half empty viewpoint. but i think what's really going to be interesting goi ing forwa is in a sense a kind of custody battle for brand mandela who claims them as their real symbol. and for mandela, symbolism was his stuff in trade. he realized that he was this astonishingly powerful symbol. a and across the world, we all want to claim him. all other countries want to claim mandela he represents our better selves in that sense. but within south africa, the question is he now a national symbol or to what extent the anc keeps him as their symb
do not have the same access to material educational resources, et cetera, et cetera. right? that it's not sort of this evil, bad guy, individual villain situation going on. and, unfortunately, i think because, as you said, also, we have not actually had a lot of practice at having these kinds of discussions about, sort of, how systems work, to oppress large groups of people, while at the same time, they work to privilege other large groups of people that, you know, the first response that many of us have is one of defense, defensiveness. so, you know, sometimes that's what happens in the classroom, unfortunately. because i -- >> i was going to say, professor gibney. absolutely, right? sometimes, particularly when we're trying to foster conversations that young people are not used to having, on any of a variety of topics, but race can be one of the key ones, defensiveness is one part of it, which is part of why it always falls on us to do the work of trying to make these classrooms sites of democratic deliberations that are useful. so when you have had success, when you have had stud
experience or they will exchange out for education, for a couple of the years. a lot of people coming out of college may have part-time jobs elsewhere or going through a difficult economic time with the job market that it has recently been, how do we have the ability to get that experience? a lot of young people are looking for jobs to be able to get that experience and learn obvious job training that maybe they are not getting through their college career. what is your college background and are you still paying off college loans? caller: i am. i just finished my masters degree. i am currently employed at i has been in the job market, i have been in the professionals setting since i was 16 years old. i spent a lot of time building that experience, maybe not making as much as other people. if i am thankful i have had that ability to get that experience. i am finding a lot of young people participate in clubs and organizations, whether or not they are getting paid or getting whatever they can to get a tiny bit of experience on their resume. aret of companies out there looking for 5, 10, 10
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
was absolutely passionate about education, and he had a great affinity with children, because remember, 27 years in prison, he hardly saw a child. and it was the one thing he said he really missed was the touch of a child. so he paid a lot of attention to the youth. and as you say, democracy here in south africa, the anniversary of those first democratic elections is next year, it was 20 years ago. so a lot of people, a lot of these people here didn't know apartheid, didn't know about the feel, the indignities of it, but they still know that nelson mandela made sacrifices for them. and the key is -- and he was very, very passionate about it -- he wanted his legacy to live on way after he had gone. and dethat he did that, "you ca like me in a small way. it's not hard to be nelson mandela. just pay attention to the people close to you and keep on trying hard and never give up." that in a way is his legacy. >> and they are living his legacy out. robin, thank you. appreciate it. >> reporter: okay. >>> one of the icons of new york honored nelson mandela last night. look at this. the top of the empire
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> we're back with debby wasserman schultz and reince priebus. >> i want to set the stage. in a recent poll, 80% of the country distrusts washington and does not think washington makes the right decision on a regular basis. the country is clearly going to want to change. you are likely to nominate somebody who first became active in 1972 as a mcgovern field person who then became a national figure in 1992, which means that if you are under 42 years of age, you couldn't vote when her husband first ran. do you really think hillary clinton is the face of change the country will want to vote for in 2016? >> there's a reason that my counter part a few minutes ago said their party as a problem winning presidential elections. they are dramatically out of touch with most americans in the country. it is because even though he had a rebrand, it hasn't worked out so well. because just yesterday you could look at the things that the organizations did to alienate us african-americans, hispanics, i mean, jews an
there wasn't a clearing, wasn't a building. >> over 20 years, his turtle island education center became popular. he taught a thousand he taught a thousand people how to live like pioneers. last year the county told him to shut down. >> he hadn't gotten a permit. >> the county board oversees the building department. >> people said his camp was unsafe. we don't necessarily know whether it is unsafe or not. >> the mountain man told inspectors to go away so they came back. >> they brought all of these different departments from the health kept, the tax people, the fire marshal all of a sudden it whole team like the cars and trucks as far as you could see came up with armed guards and took over our home. >> doesn't that seem like over kill? >> not really. they had it on the side. >> he had the opportunity to cooperate. >> they have a 78 page report on what the mountain man must change. >> it is in aptis payings. >> they said this is interim housing. i don't know if they thought we in midgets here or what. >> they said you have unsafe building resting on a piece of rock. >> like a rock solid
are the jobs? >> unemployment for college-educated workers is below 4%. so when you look at that 7% number, it represents a lot of people who have not gotten their high school education or maybe just have a high school education. if you have a college degree, we're seeing job growth in professional and business services, certainly in engineering which continues to be kind of a real driver of jobs, health care is net hire job creator over the last several years and hires nurses and other technicians. there are good jobs being created. when you look at this total number, say, 200,000-plus this month, certainly a good percentage of them were in the lower wage category. but then we want -- those people who are out of work having the hardest time, need those jobs, too. >> we saw the fight over raising the minimum wage heat up this week. you wrote an interesting piece about the rise of income inequality. what would raising the minimum wage do in this country to close the income gap? do we even know? >> first of all, i'm all in favor of having this discussion about wages and equality. the minimum
have health care, kids would be educated, we wouldn't have two million people locked up in jail and we wouldn't have drones destroying the lives of people that we don't know. god bless the pope. and i'm glad the cardinal hears him. i wish other religions would hear them, because there's a vacuum in congress. capitalism is the best thing in the world, but it's not set up to take care of the poor. >> congressman charlie rangel, great to have you here. i think you can easily invest in green ba nananabananas. thanks for your time. >>> joining me now, editor of the "washington post" wonkblog, ezra klein. good to see you, buddy. it was a big weekend for the administration. now they're touting these big gains, coming out with nbc news being able to verify these numbers. 100,000 numbers successfully selected health insurance plans in november, up from the 27,000 in october. and we had jennifer palmieri speak to our chuck todd this morning. i want to play more about what she has to say about promoting this website. >> the question about what you're getting at, i think, is whether or not we're t
for one-to-one support and education. >>> welcome back to "the lead." our world lead. paging dennis rodman. the world needs you to check in with your friend kim jong-un and find out what's going on in north korea. rumors are swirling courtesy of south korean lawmakers that kim jong-un's uncle has been hurt. two of his aides have been executed. the uncle is a well known top adviser to the leader and vice chairman of north korea's top military body. we should be clear cnn has not independently verified any of this and the state department says it has no information to share. and we're serious about rodman's diplomacy. he's going back to north korea in a couple weeks for a documentary. when it comes to kim jong-un, what should we make of his ousting his uncle if it's true? is it sign of an internal political power struggle of kim jong-un separating from his father? i want to bring in christopher hill, former ambassador, he was the lead u.s. delegate during the six-party talks with north korea from 2005 to 2009. mr. ambassador, thanks so much. as we said, cnn has not verified this. how trustwo
or get the education he wanted. his only goal was that i could do those things. and with nelson mandela, i could. they feel that gratitude to him and these are very young people today. it's the sense this isn't really even memories, it's the active workings of his message and work he did in his life. it's important for people to feel like this is an ongoing struggle. there's still difficulties in society here today, it's a democratic society now but there's a big gap between rich and poor. people feel they dont want that momentum he started and acted upon to be just words now. want to make sure it lives on in action. people are talking about that. people are coming here with their entire families and friends of various races and they are really making it known how they felt about nelson mandela and how they still feel about them. >> a dynamic slice of history you're going through. a lot planned in terms of memorials. what's on the schedule? >> first of all, this sunday, the president has declared it a national day of prayer and encouraging everybody to get together and have your own gat
of highly educated young professionals who choose to start their careers there. that's a way for them to tap into that. they're not going to be too unhappy if some of these workers say no to the long commute and choose to leave. >> these companies are saying, i can save a lot of money by hiring kids out of college at a much lower pay scale and get rid really? >> it may not be quite that sinister, but that's definitely in the back of their mind. >> that's really too bad. you know why? let's look at this. these boomers, ages 48 to 66, and then the gen-xeres, these are the people who have kids who they're trying to put through college. we're talking about people who are taking care of their elderly aging parents. really, that's a company where they've been for 25 years, that's how the companies want to treat them? >> you know, that's corporate america. it's about the bottom line here. the one thing they can fall back on, 43% of all americans with a bachelors degree live in an urban environment. a lot of corporations are choosing to do this. archer daniels is one. yahoo! has decided to do this,
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. medicare open enrollment. of year again. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare >>> well, the white house has backed away from a reported statement made two years ago that president obama had never met an uncle who lives near boston. well, it turns out that the president not only knew him, he once lived with him. why so much confusion? cnn's brian todd has more. >> reporter: he's a 69-year-old man who works at a liquor store near boston and he's now caught up in the president's latest political migraine. the man's name, onyango obama, also called omar, the president's uncle. "the boston globe" previously cited the white house as saying the president and hess uncle had never met, but the white house press secretary now says
of information with equal education and access for everyone. >> you know, joe, i wanted to share pugh took a look at why are people poor? not surprisingly -- disappointingly not surprisingly, democrats said because of uncontrollable circumstances and 24% said lack of effort. for republicans, it was about exactly the reverse. 28% said uncontrollable circumstances versus 57% who said lack of effort. so, that is, of course, why the fake war on christmas that bill o'reilly is choosing to talk about is, you know, semantics rather than these issues of makers and takers, right? >> yeah. absolutely. and this whole thing of christmas versus holiday really is a distraction. it's a diversion from the statistics that you just pointed out. look. let's make something very clear and i learned this, someone told me this a long time ago. no human being on this planet deliberately starves themselves. no one. no one deliberately starves themselves. i don't care where you live. it was nelson mandela that, in fact, said poverty is man-made. >> right. >> man-made. and so, that's what you're talking about. what liberal
investments and infrastructure and education, so this gives him a little fuel to do that as the rollout to obama care has been so rocky. this is certainly something the white house is welcoming here. >> we'll check back. brianna keilar live at the white house this morning. >>> and now let's head back to washington and bring in wolf blitzer for more on our special coverage of the passing of nelson mandela. wolf, take it away. >> to the world, nelson mandela was a freedom fighting revolutionary who later rose to be a statesman and influenced others as aan icon and ambassador of peace. in his native south africa he was lovingly known as madiba, a symbol his countrymen had for their president. jacob zuma yesterday spoke about his legacy. >> we'll always love madiba for teaching us that it is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation and a new society. >> president zuma also announced funeral plans for nelson mandela, including a national day of prayer and reflection this sunday, an open air memorial service at johannesburg soccer stadium next tuesday and his buria
. in november, many were good-paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care, 27,000 manufacturing jobs added. 17,000 construction jobs. >> now we're getting consistent job reports that are plus 200,000. that's very positive not only for the economy but it should be positive for people should start to feel generally better. that conditions are in fact improving. >> on closer look, the unemployment rate for adult men is at 6.7%. for women, 6.2%. but the numbers are higher for african-americans and teenagers. still, some worry washington's upcoming budget battles could threaten the recovery. >> it's quite clear that the u.s. economy pays attention to what washington is doing. but this is an unpredictable business. makes it interesting, but it makes it hard to know sort of what the washington does in the next week, month, or year. what that means for sort of how much the economy can recover and at what rate. >> while there might be political uncertainty, for the time being, there is only good news for those like recent college grad eddie christian who just landed his first job. >> i look at this
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. >>> good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for join iing me. >>> investigators are trying to figure out why a train that derailed sunday killing four people was going 82 miles an hour, nearly three times the speed limit it should have been going around a curve. train's engineer is being questioned for a second day as investigators try to pinpoint why that train was going so fast. >>> health officials say there is little chance that passengers on a us airways flight might come down with tuberculosis after a scare in the air. a passenger was removed from the plane on a flight from austin to phoenix. >> the flight attendant approached us. she had a mask in her hands that you cover your nose with. she approached the man. he was about mid cabin, i would say, to my left. a window seat, a very slight -- slightly built man and told him to put the mask on. >> cdc says it's still waiting for test results to confirm if, indeed, that passenger really has tb. this morning, we have new video to show you t
certainly is are -- in the broader use of i.t. and businesses and health care and education, real need for innovation and software and data centers and being able to make use of all this information and have it create better outcomes for patients for students to solve all the challenges that are out there. and so we have been building really changed the company quite dramatic will i in the last five years and building a whole new set of capabilities, and we'll invest in those further as a private company without an on session, short-term results with focus on the long term. >> i want to go back to charlie's point about the bruising battle for a second. it did get a little nasty with carl icahn. i wonder how you feel about him. next time are you going to invite him out to lunch, say i like your shoes, or this is how it goes. >> i don't think i'll be -- >> or like your tie. you know what i mean. >> let's go to dinner. >> come over to my house for christmas. >> you know what i mean. it got a little heated between the two of you. >> you know, this is the largest c
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